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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
grew up in a south africa divided by apartheid. >> the anc has two options, continue doing same, which is the political party it is now, or it can make itself into a party of the 21st century. so it has to think about the young voters, the people who were born after apartheid, born even in the 1990s who are now the youngest voters in south africa, those are the voters that it has to create a strategy for, the voters they have to convince to go to the polls and vote. >> this is a crossroads isn't it? >> yes, it is a crossroads, it cannot claim just to be the party that liberated south africa, it has to create more positive claims. >> it can't rely on nelson mandela and its history. >> right. but it's about the history of libertying south africa from white rule. it is a history that doesn't build houses. it is a history that builds clinics and makes schools run. they have to try to put in place the kind of civil service that delivers that. >> because searveg has a lot of -- searve south africa has af problems it is dealing with. how much of that should be blamed on the anc, the ruling pa
reagan's -- the anc because we called ate communist organization. i think the willingness to look at south africa beyond cold arrest terms even when the cold war was raging in the neigh years. >> when you talked to nelson mandela, did you find that he -- had he forgiven the west for, you know, having mostly for the most part sided against the anc? >> i think in my conversations with him, he forgive the west, yes, and he realized that a huge amount of learnings we can pick up from western leaders and in deed we did pick up a huge amount of learnings. i think for example, you remember quite well when he came out he emphasized a question that ultimately these enterprises are going to be nationalized and that was the policy of the anc and so forth and so on. i think it was because of his contacts with major western leaders that he was able to motivate that viewpoint. i'm not trying to suggest that mandela as some people like to suggest simply loving -- i think he succumbed to reason and that reason came from his peers largely in the west. >> peter, what do you think explains the dropo
administration branded the anc a terrorist group and dick cheney voted against a resolution to release nelson mandela. so this was all happening around the world. >> right. i think peter godwin's point that south africa's transition was facile traitated by the end the cold what are is extremely important but it's important to remember in the 1980s a lobl anti-apartheid movement arose during the cold war in which people in america said we're not going to see south africa in purely cold war terms. we're not going to sep reagan's pacic envision that the apartheid regime is on the part of the free world because it's anti-communist and the anc, they are on the side of unfreedom. i think the willingness to look at south africa beyond cold war terms when when the cold war was raging was critically important to the transition in south africa. >> when you talked with nelson mandela, did you find that he -- had he forgiven the west for, you know, having mostly for the most part sided against the anc? >> i think in my conversations with him, he forgave the west, and he realized there's a huge amount of
was a loyal member of the anc as he said. part of his virtue as a politician was that he changed and bended. the anc said, national of the minds, he believed that, he changed his mind. but what he always believed and never forgot and it's a little bit unpopular to say he believed politics was way of changing people's lives for the better. and he was proud to call himself a politics that is what he did. >> as politics you also understood dramatic flourish. there were moments, we saw that in 1990 when he did that eight-city tour. i think when he went to detroit he quoted marvin gay. in front of that audience, it was brilliant. mother, mother, too many of -- brother, brother, too many of you are dying, mother, mother, too many are crying. he understood the moment. >> schieffer: what did he say in new york? >> can i just tell a story. when we were doing christmas kindness in south africa go to remote villages. thousands of kids would be waiting for their soccer balls and jersey. a local politician went on for an hour about political theory. nelson mandela did twinkle, twinkle, little star and
. there were strong strands within the anc, within south africa, that were centered on black consciousness. he was intent on having an election with mandate that reduced their role. he focused on, as you know, the pan african congress, polling 2% or 3% of the poll. historically, they played a big role in africa and the liberation struggle. he wanted to use the election to send a message this would be an inclusive country. >> and jendayi frazer. talking about the relationship with people he didn't necessarily get along with. we know f.w. de klerk. they shared a nobel peace prize. everyone though they didn't share much of a relationship. nelson mandela, a fierce critic of president bush on the war in iraq and the invasion of iraq. he was determined to try to maintain something of a personal relationship there. >> actually, president mandela, as fierce a critic as he was to the war in iraq supported the war in afghanistan. if you recall, in 2001 when he first met president george w. bush as the president in the oval office, he came out and forcefully endorsed america going into afghanistan. just
escape? >> not in our time, ever. but very good plans. >> b wing is where all the key anc prisoners were held. so the man was here in this room. this room was his cell. >> from 1964 up until 1979, they were given this. >> two meters by two meters, the mat on the floor, no bed until his final years, a bucket and a precious window to the outside world. my guide has often gazed from mandela's window before. but today, he becomes overwhelmed by tears. >> an incredible life. >> yes. >> surviving this was critical. >> yes. >> and they tried everything to humiliate him? >> all the things. they did everything. trying to break him down. they even use his family. >> when he looked out of his window, mandela's solace was his small garden along the prison wall. he planted this tree and sat beneath the vine he nurtured from the courtyard grid. on his last year on robben island, mandela was allowed to work here cape town, tantalizingly close. surviving robben island, to emerge preaching both hope and forgiveness, utterly central to mandela's position here and across the world. they are bound up in tha
to the standards of their white counterparts to give them both purpose and hope. >> the truth is the anc is la really struggled to fulfill nelson mandela's idealistic vision, school buildings are falling apart and crowding is rife. schools ton bleak cape flat south side cape town is more symbolistic of the system struggling with. activists argued there is a dangerous gap between promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate. but to graduate students only need 30% on their exams. a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> and the end of the study about 50% of those young people have fallen out of the system. so it also has to do with the curriculum, it has -- also has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had during end today. >> so schools are still struggling with the legacy of apartheid, its burden stubbornly persistent, the burdens of the system much longer than nelson mandela ever imagined. peter gresta, al jazeera, cape town. >> again as mills around the world gathered to remember the man they knew as the father of south af
, disguised as a gardener. members. a.n.c. gathered here and the armed wing as well. nelson mandela met with them, they discussed the revolution and what country they wanted to have in the future. nelson mandela was away from the farm when it was raided by police. a large number of a.n.c. leaders were arrested and put into prison. nelson mandela was arrested on his way back to the form, the beginning of a long gaol sentence. he was accused in the robinia trial. the words that he spoke from the dock resonate on this particular day. he said, "i have stood against white domination. i have stood against black domination and cherish the ideal of a democratic society in which people live in harmony and equal opportunity." it's words that people celebrating the death of nelson mandela are cherishing. >> nelson mandela's home in sow is a central point for mourners. nick, i know it's late. what is the crowd like? is it growing? >> yes, it's huge here in soweto. there's about 1,000 people within a few hundred feet of me. there's restaurants to my left. it's a celebration of nelson mandela's life
. helping the u.s. do the right thing around apartheid. others felled no, nelson mandela is with the a.n.c., it was a terrorist organization so a.n.c. should not support. we saw on the ground an opportunity, an opportunity to make sure the u.s. embodied the best of its values as it related to south africa, making sure it did not support apartheid. >> talk about how nelson mandela influenced foreign state policy. >> an interesting thing is nelson mandela did not abandon friends. there's something i know, clinton talked about, he disagreed with nelson mandela on the issue of cuba and his relationship with fidel castro. nelson mandela did not forget his friends. they stood with him. making sure countries in africa could stand together and do what was in the best interests of their people, may not necessarily benefit all. all people around the planet knew that it is possible, that you can make the impossible possible. and that is what happened, and that is, to me, what his life embodied. >> that is why the world is remembering nelson mandela. >> thank you for your time today. >> thank you. >>
that in time. but as you note, many regimes, many governments saw him and the anc as terrorists and responded accordingly. >> one of the things that's always struck me about nelson mandela's life was here was a guy who could have had the ultimate chip on his shoulder. and not once did you ever see or hear or read about public bitterne bitterness. nelson mandela never displayed any sort of public bitterness. >> i think nelson mandela, consistent with martin luther king and gandhi and others, i think recognized when he emerged from that prison cell that if he were going to lead south africa, he needed a message not only of reconciliation but of a multiracial south africa. and he did a great job in presenting that message. and i think he surprised people that when he emerged from 27 years of imprisonment, i don't think anyone can imagine what it would be like to spend that much time in a narrow jail cell, to be cut off and then to come back and be so lucid, so politically astute, so politically aware and really emerge as one of the great leaders of our times. >> donald, when we talk about mandel
movement, that we do the right thing around apartheid. mandela, he's with the a.n.c., and some considered that to be a terrorist organization. we had solidarity with people on the ground. we saw an opportunity to make sure that the u.s. embodied the best of its values as it related to africa and that was to make sure that we did not continue to support apartheid. >> tell us about his influence on the united states policy. >> he did not abandon friends. for example, something that i know president clinton has talked about, he always disagreed with president mandela on the issue of cuba and on his relationship with fidel castro. president mandela was not one to forget his friends. he also had such an impact on the african union and creation of the african union, making sure the countries in africa could stand together and do what was in the best interest of their people. sometimes that would not be necessarily what was in the best interest of our countries. he really works to make sure that it wasn't just the people of south africa has benefited from the struggle but that all people around
then the anc has really struggled to fulfill nelson mandela's idealistic mission. overcrowding is rife. schools on the bleak south side capetown are more typical the system is troubled with. >> information technology. >> activists argue, there is a dangerous gap between the promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate but to graduate students only need 30% of on their exams. a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> about 50% of those young people have fallen out of the system. so irt also has to do with the curriculum. it also has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had during the end today. >> so schools are still struggling with the legacy of apartheid, this generation is bearing the scars of the system much longer than nelson mandela ever imagined. peti gresta, al jazeera, cape town. >> the short list of the world football, surprises el madrid and bril brilliant in 2013, spog 16 goals for club and country. barcelona's are star has won this crown but argentina has been troubled by injury this year. midfielder, won the cham
amazing story that he told me was on the night before they left prison calling all the anc prisoners together and saying, yes, they would be justified in acts of revenge, retaliation and retribution, but there could never then be a strong, successful, multiracial society, and that was his second great achievement, to achieve change through reconciliation. but, you know, there was a didder achievement, refusing to rest or relax when he gave up the presidency. he had great achievement to his name. he himself wrote that in the first part of his life he had climbed one great mountain to end apartheid, but now in his later life he wanted to climb another great mountain, to rid the world of poverty and especially the outrage of child poverty. and i need speak of only what i saw in the times that i worked with him, how quietly and without fanfare he went about his work. 2005 i flew to south africa to meet nelson mandela to persuade him to come to london so that he could then persuade the finance ministers of the need for debt relief to relieve poverty, and this he did. and then in 2006 with
about 8%. let all two to the lobby, shall we, and get ourselves some stock? anc theater gearing up to go public. most loyal customers buying shares. members of anc sub rewards program, they offered the same price as bank and wall street zugs institutions according to jerry lopez, so everybody getting in on the action. >> the only thing i care about is what this means for ticket prices. i am saying it is expensive to go to the movies. >> i don't think you will see prices go up. i think they are sharing the love. >> sharing the love, is that what they're doing? >> exactly. thanks, allison. coming up next on "new day," budget de ja vu. four days and counting until congress can get its act together this time around. accidence of u.s. leaders convergeing on south africa, paying tribute to nelson mandela. chris cuomo is there live. he is speaking which someone who knew mandela well. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and
in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us next in the "newsroom." thanks for giving me your smile. thanks for inspiring me. thanks for showing me my potential. for teaching me not to take life so seriously. thanks for loving me and being my best friend. don't forget to thank those who helped you take charge of your future and got you where you are today. the boss of your life. the chief life officer. ♪ are still high in acidic content. if your enamel is exposed to aci
and hope. >> the a.n.c. has struggled to fill full nelson mandela's vision. the system is crippled, school buildings falling apart and they have crowding. >> cape town is typical of the struggle. >> i wants to be a doctor. >> he wants to be an information technology. >> there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate, but to graduate, students only need 30% on their exams, a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> in the end of the 12 years study, about 60% of those young people have fallen out of the system, so it also has to do with the curriculum. it has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had. >> schools are still struggling with the legend of apartheid. this generation is bearing the scars of the system much longer than nelson mandela imagined. >> the world economic forum of switzerland ranked south africa 146 out of one fought eight countries in education, ranking last in mathematics and science. >> officials in singapore are cleaning up after a riot. crowds attacked police and
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)